HISTORY & BIOGRAPHY

With Eric H. Cline

Join archaeologist and ancient historian Eric H. Cline to learn about how archaeology works, from deciding where to dig to figuring out how old something is; for armchair archaeologists as well as those about to go on their first excavation. Two Mondays: June 10 and 17 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Elisabeth Griffith

Because every month is women’s history month, this class will focus on four major struggles women engaged in to achieve equal rights. Women fought for: the right to learn and earn; the right to vote; the right to govern; and the right to survive and thrive. Four Tuesdays: June 4, 11, 18, and 25 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Richard Bell

Join UMD History Professor Richard Bell for a look at our now well-known Founding Father, Alexander Hamilton. Discuss what the Broadway musical gets right and gets wrong about Alexander Hamilton, the American Revolution, and the birth of the United States, and why all that matters. Two Wednesdays: June 19 and 26 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET Online

With Garrett Peck

Join author Garrett Peck to explore the Manhattan Project, one of the twentieth century’s greatest but controversial scientific achievements that resulted in the atomic bomb. Three Wednesdays: July 10, 17, 24 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET Online

With Julie Des Jardins

Join historian Julie Des Jardins for a talk about the lessons in Lessons in Chemistry that continue to affect women in science today. One Monday: September 30 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

FICTION

With Leigha McReynolds

Celebrate the 200th birthday of Wilkie Collins by reading the novel he intended to be his masterwork. The epic sensation novel Armadale (1864) has it all: secret identities, intricate plots, and dangerous women. Together we’ll explore how Collins challenged Victorian orthodoxies and consider his literary legacy. Four Wednesdays: May 29, June 5, 12 and 19 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET Online

With Janet Hulstrand

The shadow of World War II still hangs very heavy over France, and recent events have rekindled fears of rising antisemitic activity in France and elsewhere. This class will discuss three books exploring the years preceding, during, and after the Nazi Occupation of France. Four Fridays: May 17, 31, June 14 and 21 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET Online

With Sarah Pleydell

Join instructor Sarah Pleydell as we work to demystify Virginia Woolf's seminal novel, The Waves. Two Saturdays: July 13 and 20 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET Online

With Brittany Kerfoot

Join instructor Brittany Kerfoot as we dive into perfect summer reading with four of Ann Patchett's novels. Together will read Bel Canto, Commonwealth, The Dutch House, and her newest novel, Tom Lake. Four Thursdays meeting biweekly: June 13, 27, July 11 and 25 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Verlyn Flieger

Join Tolkien expert Verlyn Flieger as she dives into “The Athrabeth” and “Myths Transformed”, based on JRR Tolkien’s most challenging and perplexing work. One Sunday: August 4 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. ET Online

With Kara Keeling

Dorothy Sayers, one of the Queens of Crime Writers of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction in the 1920s–30s, gradually merged the detective novel with the novel of manners. These later books, following Lord Peter Wimsey’s courtship of the mystery writer Harriet Vane, breathed new life into the genre. Join us to discuss Sayers’s Wimsey-Vane quartet: Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night, and Busman’s Honeymoon. Four Tuesdays: July 23, 30, August 6, and 13 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET Online

With Sørina Higgins

The once-and-future King Arthur, knights in shining armor, the Round Table, Camelot, Excalibur, Lancelot & Guinevere: we’ll look at some of the most influential works of Arthurian Legend and talk about why they’re so popular, how they’ve changed over time, and what’s important about them today. Three Thursdays: August 1, 8, and 15 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Michele L. Simms-Burton

Join former university professor of African American literature on the centennial of the birth of James Baldwin to read and discuss his beautifully written and groundbreaking novel Giovanni’s Room. Two Saturdays: August 10 and August 17, 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET Online 

With Carrie Callaghan

Join historical novelist Carrie Callaghan for a close look at Daniel Mason’s charming and rich novel, North Woods. We will gain a deeper appreciation for Mason’s deftly-woven story and his timeless, deeply relevant themes. One Sunday: October 13 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET Online

With Andrew Bertaina

Join writer and professor Andrew Bertaina as he discusses how to construct speculative, spooky, and fantastical worlds. This course will focus on reading, discussion, and generative prompts as we explore realities beyond our own by studying writers like Kelly Link, David Lawrence Morse, and Rion Amilcar Scott. Three Thursdays: October 10, 17 and 24 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Michele L. Simms-Burton

Join former Howard University and University of Michigan professor Michele L. Simms-Burton for lively and spirited discussions John Edgar’s Wideman’s three works of fiction known as The Homewood Trilogy. Five Saturdays: September 21, 28, October 5, (Oct 12 - SKIP) 19, and 26 from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET Online

With Brittany Kerfoot

One of the most respected and prolific writers in a generation, Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro’s stories are timeless and universal—a feat few authors can accomplish. Arguably the best short story writer of all time, Munro captured the human experience in all its stages—from girlhood to adolescence, middle age to life’s final chapter—over 14 stunning collections.Three Tuesdays: October 15, 22, and 29 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

WRITING

With JiJi Lee

Join Shouts and Murmurs contributor JiJi Lee to learn the fundamentals of writing short-form humor. Four Thursdays: June 6, 13, 20 and 27 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

with Mia Brabham Nolan

Join author and writer Mia Brabham Nolan to receive help getting “unstuck” in a current piece of work or writing you are working on, learning a few new storytelling skills along the way. Two Mondays: July 15th and 22nd from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Online

With Amy Suardi

Explore memoir-writing in its briefest form—the micro-memoir (300 words or less)—with author Amy Suardi, and experience the refreshing lightness of writing short. Three Wednesdays: July 10, 17, and 24 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Online

With Sean Blink

Crafting a college admissions essay doesn’t have to be torture! Join Yale Ph.D. and former admissions consultant Sean Blink for this three-part workshop on brainstorming, drafting, and perfecting admissions essays. Three Sundays: July 28, August 18, and September 8 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET Online

With Joyce Winslow

Four sessions of lecture and in-class workshops teach successful ways to write, format, pitch, and place OP Eds, how to persuasively make your point, and research and take down opposing arguments (politely). Op Eds are the second most read page in a newspaper; 500 mainstream newspapers want to hear from you! Three Thursdays: September 12, 19, and 26 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

with Nevin Martell

Join veteran food writer and cookbook author Nevin Martell to learn the foundational skills necessary for writing a creative, compelling food memoir. Four Tuesdays: September 10, 17,  24, and October 1 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Chloe Yelena Miller

Do you have a story to tell? Interested in writing your story to understand it better? Join Chloe Yelena Miller to discuss and write memoir. We’ll talk about memoir broadly, write together and workshop opening paragraphs. Three Mondays: September 23, 30, and October 7 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET Online

With Kathy Curto
Making lists may seem like a simple, everyday act, but sometimes both the process and the product can illuminate our writing lives. Join Professor Kathy Curto in the reading of some classic lists in literature, then in the crafting of your own list and story. Three Tuesdays: November 12, 19 and 26 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

POETRY

With David Keplinger

Join American University Professor and Director of AU’s MFA Program in Creative Writing, David Keplinger, for a look into the draw of Mary Oliver’s poetry. Two Thursdays: July 11 and 18 from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET Online

With Michael Blumenthal

Join poet, novelist and former Director of Harvard’s Creative Writing Program Michael Blumenthal for a poetry writing workshop aimed at plumbing the unconscious to write poems that are both accessible and mysterious. Three Mondays: July 29, August 5, and 12 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET Online

With Indran Amirthanayagam

Celebrate the sweeping, long-lined yet intimate and multicultural poetry of our country's foundational poet, Walt Whitman, with instructor and author Indran Amirthanayagam. Four Thursdays: August 8, 15, 22 and 29 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Gigi Bradford

Join Gigi Bradford to read the poems of acclaimed American poet Marie Howe, lauded for her ability to mesh the secular and the sacred in contemporary life. Three Tuesdays: September 24, October 1 and 8 from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET Online

Sandra Beasley

Few poets have ensnared the popular imagination the way that Sylvia Plath has. This class will explore Plath's book Ariel, to better understand the challenges and flaws of the work—and the question of what could have been. One Sunday: October 27 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

MEDITATION & PHILOSOPHY

With Frank Ambrosio

The Denial of Death by American cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker discusses the psychological and philosophical implications of how people and cultures have reacted to the concept of human mortality. Join Frank Ambrosio to discuss this seminal work, winner of the 1974 Pulitzer Prize. Three Tuesdays: July 9, 16 and 23 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Online

With Jerry Webster

Gain a healing connection to ourselves, others and the natural world in this meditation class based on the teachings of David Rome and Karen Armstrong. Four Wednesdays, July 31, and August 7, 14, and 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Online 

With Jerry Webster

Using Pema Chodron and Susan Gillis Chapman’s books as our guide, this meditation class will offer an up close and personal look at maintaining openness, courage, and equanimity during some of life’s most challenging moments. Four Mondays: September 16, 23, 30 and October 7 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Online

POLITICS & PLACE

With Heba F. El-Shazli

Travel to the Sultanate of Oman through the writings of Jokha Alharthi, the first Omani woman to have a novel translated into English. Read her novels Bitter Orange Tree and Celestial Bodies, the first book translated from Arabic to win the Man Booker International Prize. Two Tuesdays: July 30 and August 6, from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

With Steven Steinbach

Steve Steinbach – teacher, lawyer, and constitutional historian – returns to teach a new series of classes focused on the Constitution and the Supreme Court. Join us to explore a wide variety of constitutional controversies, past and present. Four Wednesdays: October 9, 16, 23, and 30 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Online

SALON

With Hans Noel

Professor Hans Noel of Georgetown University will lead a discussion on what political science can tell us about the unusual 2024 U.S. election. One Wednesday: September 25, 2024 from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Den Coffeehouse

NONFICTION

With Janet Hulstrand

In this class we will explore how Paris has served as a muse for four American women: Gertrude Stein, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis. Four Fridays: October 18, 25, November 1 and 8 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET Online

CLASSICS

With Mojgan Ghazirad

Join Mojgan Ghazirad, Iranian-American author and Professor at the George Washington University for in-depth reading and conversation about the 13th Century Persian Poet Jalaluddin Rumi and his poems in Masnavi, his main book of poetry. Three Tuesdays: July 9, 16, 23 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET Online

With Victoria Pedrick

What makes the Odyssey so eminently readable? Are we attracted to tales of trying to make it home? (Re)read the Odyssey in this summer course, the perfect time for wandering and adventure, and become reacquainted with this ancient epic. Six Mondays: July 8, 15, 22, 29, August 5 and 12 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

With Victoria Pedrick

What makes the Odyssey so eminently readable? Are we attracted to tales of trying to make it home? (Re)read the Odyssey in this summer course, the perfect time for wandering and adventure, and become reacquainted with this ancient epic. Six Wednesdays: July 10, 17, 24, 31, and August 7, 14, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET Online

With Sean Blink

Join Yale Ph.D. Sean Blink, for a close reading of the ultimate literary bucket list item—Leo Tolstoy’s magnum opus, War and PeaceSix Tuesdays meeting biweekly: October 1, October 15, October 29, November 12, November 26, December 10 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Online