Every few years the Booker Prize panel chooses an unexpected winner. With The White Tiger (Simon & Schuster, $14, paper; $24, hardcover), business-journalist-turned-novelist Aravind Adiga offers an unconventional get-rich-quick manual and guide to liberating the mind for the politically and economically oppressed lower-caste of India; his narrator’s insights are the ultimate appeal of this darkly honest tale of a self-made man. Born impoverished and therefore hungry, Balram Halwai has an eye for observing society and an ear for gossip, and he uses his resourcefulness to educate himself about the world and elevate himself in Indian business. Shrewdly sycophantic and connivingly opportunistic, Balram twists his way through corrupt and caste-driven Delhi. Is he amoral or merely adaptive in his quest for mental and economic freedom? Aravind Adiga offers a beguilingly seductive anti-hero for this new century of globalization.

The White Tiger: A Novel Cover Image
$17.00
ISBN: 9781416562603
Availability: In Stock—Click for Locations
Published: Free Press - October 14th, 2008

When one of Roberto Bolaño’s characters praises “the great, imperfect, torrential works, books that blaze paths into the unknown,” he’s describing Moby-Dick and Kafka’s Trial, but also 2666 (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $30). The final completed work by the extraordinary Chilean writer, this book has five parts, each of which could stand alone as a satisfying novel. Together, they resolve specific mysteries, deepen larger ones, and form a brilliant panorama of humanity’s follies, quirks, and outrages, ranging from the genteel pursuits of European literary critics to the depravities of World War II, to the harrowing unsolved murders of women in Juárez, Mexico. Above all, Bolaño is a compulsive storyteller, and his narratives continually spin off in surprising directions, often told by the characters themselves, as Bolaño’s amazingly dexterous, manic, and fully crafted prose lends itself by turns to the voices of cynical cops, tough thugs, the working poor of Mexico’s maquiladoras, sorrowing mothers, an earnest Brooklyn journalist, and unintentionally humorous elderly soldiers. This is a huge, stunning novel, without a wasted word.

2666: A Novel Cover Image
By Roberto Bolaño, Natasha Wimmer (Translated by)
$27.00
ISBN: 9780312429218
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Picador - September 1st, 2009

Death With Interruptions (Harcourt, $24) is José Saramago’s “true yet untrue story of death and her vagaries.” It begins with the fantastic premise that the people of a small country stop dying. Good news? But the hiatus, which lasts seven months, wreaks havoc with life insurance policies, causes doubts among the faithful who need physical death to reach everlasting spiritual life, and leads to overcrowding in hospitals and nursing homes. As he examines the ramifications of life without death, the Portuguese Nobel laureate offers sharp social commentary and philosophical meditations on mortality, as well as introducing a death who, though cold, can learn to care for those she comes for.

Death with Interruptions Cover Image
By José Saramago, Margaret Jull Costa (Translated by)
$15.95
ISBN: 9780547247885
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Mariner Books - September 2nd, 2009

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