Emma Donoghue’s novel ROOM (Little, Brown, $24.99) is told through the irrepressible and naive voice of Jack, a five-year-old who has lived his entire life inside an 11’ x 11’ shed. Jack’s depiction of “Room,” as he calls it, belies the horrid reality that exists for him and “Ma,” his only friend, teacher, and protector from “Old Nick,” who keeps them both captive. Donoghue takes an unthinkable situation and challenges the reader to relate to it in familiar ways. The magic here is not in creating an epic novel that covers generations and a constellation of characters, for which many authors have been praised, but in crafting an intimate story of a mother, a son, and how they survive and support each other in a confined space. Later, as Jack and Ma re-enter society, the narrative reveals how much “Room” has affected them both, and details the challenging process of individuation and recovery from trauma and deprivation. Skillful storytelling reveals the pair’s confusion and resilience, and will have you caring and rooting for them as they deal with the aftermath of a life they never chose. 

Room: A Novel Cover Image
$29.00
ISBN: 9780316098335
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Little, Brown and Company - September 13th, 2010

Room: A Novel Cover Image
$16.99
ISBN: 9780316098328
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Back Bay Books - May 18th, 2011

Tom McCarthy’s C (Knopf, $25.95) is a novel unlike any you’ve ever read. The story begins with the birth of Serge Carrafax at the dawn of the 20th century, and follows him from adolescence to maturity through a number of the hallmark events of the period. Carrafax is obsessed with radio communication and technology, and serves as an artillery observer in World War I. He’s later addicted to cocaine and morphine, and delves into the culture of the séance salons of London; in Egypt, he carries out a spy mission under the guise of being a surveyor. McCarthy’s use of language and allusion, metaphor and symbol, offers the reader an experience akin to an archeological dig, as the novel’s many layers slowly yield their secrets.

C Cover Image
$16.95
ISBN: 9780307388216
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Vintage - September 6th, 2011

A boisterous romp through a present-day London that looks an awful lot like the vividly imagined worlds of William Gibson’s early work, ZERO HISTORY (Putnam, $26.95) retains the polysyllabic exoticism in description that is Gibson’s own, but feels lighter, even amusing. It seems that techno-dystopia isn’t so bad, really, when you live there every day. This book completes (presumably) the informal so-called Hubertus Bigend trilogy, although each book also works as a stand-alone novel. A perfect holiday read, enjoyable, approachable, and yet not without substance. Finding profundity and insight that doesn’t take itself too seriously? This guy gets it, and so should you.

Zero History (Blue Ant #3) Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9780425240779
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Berkley - August 2nd, 2011